“Through Our Windows”
A view of the world through the eyes of autistic children

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Pameran Lukisan
(IO/Pebriawan)

One of the creators of these beautiful sets of lines is Muhammad Salman Farisyi (13). Salman’s work, Cherry Blossom, depicts the Japanese cherry blossom in a series of intense dark brown, white, pink and fuchsia slashes. You must view it from a bit of a distance to be able to discern a vibrant cherry tree with its exuberant blooms. 

Dina Farisyi, Salman’s mother, reports that his son’s paintings are part of his therapy. “That’s it first and foremost – as a means of therapy. We don’t know if Salman has talent in painting or not. We personally know his painting teacher. He initially had Salman draw all sorts of geometrical shapes on paper for three months, before allowing him to start painting on canvas,” she said. 

Confirming his wife’s statement, Salman’s father, Sofwan Farisyi, reports that Salman’s first geometrical drawings include triangles and rectangles, progressing into something like flowers in pots and viruses. “After some time, Salman’s teacher had him try to make strokes that form cherry blossom petals. Once he tried it, everyone is surprised with how expressive the works are, how pretty the colors are,” he said. 

Salman needs at least three weeks to finish a work: “He usually starts with painting the base colors. That takes about a week. Then he would draw the tree’s trunks and branches, finishing with the blossoms. Yes, that takes about three weeks,” Dina said. 

Salman also has physical therapy scheduled twice a week, with an average duration of 60 minutes per session. “Yes, it’s a routine every Wednesday and Friday. Children like Salman must have a strict schedule, so he always knows what to do at what hour today, tomorrow, and every day. The practice for painting therapy has a short duration, but it’s done often,” Sofwan said.