Roar of the Royal Enfield – boom of the Baleganjur: Drum Open the Royal Enfield International Jamboree

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(photo: Prive. Doc)

IO, Bali – The Royal Enfield motorcycle lover community, Royal Riders Indonesia (RoRI), grandly opened the International Royal Enfield Jamboree 2019 in Bali, Indonesia. Jamboree Morning Ride saw more than 300 bikers departing from Royal Enfield dealers on Sunset Highway.

Participants included RoRI members from various chapters in Indonesia, clubs and guest communities, such as the Bali Old Motor Association, Pelangi Bali British Motorcycle Club and many others. Also, some motorcycle lovers from neighboring countries participated in the activities that began at 8:30 that morning.

The Morning Ride Jamboree aims to bolster friendly feelings between bikers, not specifically for Royal Enfield users in Indonesia alone. RoRI National President Donny Hendaris detailed how riders were led around the southern tip of the island of Bali, to finish in the International Royal Enfield Jamboree area, which is on charming Melasti Beach.

Arriving at the beach, riders were not allowed to directly enter the area where the activity was taking place. Donny explained that to respect the wisdom of local culture, the organizing committee held an opening ceremony typical of the Hindu Dharma Bali religion; it was then followed by welcoming Baleganjur dances.

Hideaki Atsuta, a Japanese rider who was also the originator of the Krafty Tokyo clothing brand, expressed his appreciation of the local culture. “We’ve been presented with a Balinese feel that is not only beautiful but also magical for a start. It’s enough to compensate for the fatigue during the flight the day before,” Hideaki said.

Royal Riders Indonesia (RoRI) Communications Director Joseph Sinaga explained that this activity was an effort to promote Indonesian culture, especially that of Bali, for connoisseurs of two-wheel vehicles in Southeast Asia. RoRI also campaigned for a typical two-wheeled vehicle fan event that could be aligned with cultural performances, not just modern music. “This is important so that our culture is increasingly recognized and enjoyed by the world community, as well as passed on to the younger generation,” Joseph concluded.